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Was your termination discriminatory?

On Behalf of | Jun 1, 2018 | Wrongful Termination |

With the recent emphasis on discrimination in the workplace that has dominated the news over the past year, it’s a wonder that any employer would risk the legal and financial consequences of a discriminatory firing, but that doesn’t seem to be stopping some. You may find yourself suddenly out of a job for reasons that are either unclear or don’t seem to align with the facts as you known them, and may have grounds to believe that your own termination is actually discriminatory.

If so, you should very carefully look at all of the evidence that you have concerning why your employer chose to let you go. In light of many recent news stories (and surely more to come) detailing discriminatory firings or other forms of discrimination in the workplace, now is not the time to assume that your former employer is in the right. If anything, you have more leverage now than ever to push back against an unfair firing.

In many instances of discrimination, employers may count on you simply shouldering the burden of your termination and moving on, unwilling to deal with the hassle of a lawsuit over the matter. It is vital to remember that fighting against discrimination in the workplace requires many individuals willing to stand up for their own rights to fair treatment, thus strengthening the rights of every worker.

Are you unclear about your termination and the role that discrimination did or did not play? Don’t put it aside. Instead, consider looking into what the law itself has to say about the matter. An experienced employment law attorney can help you sit down and assess your experience fairly and accurately through the eyes of the law, giving you the tools to build your own legal strategy to join the fight for justice in the workplace and fair, equitable treatment for all people.

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